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I  have been denied access to the ability to send files from my own HDD to my own SSD despite having entered my name and PWD.

I tried to get a code thru email: no response.

I tried to get a code thru phone: no response

I tried to link my Hotmail acct to my Google address: "Try later" was the Microsoft answer!

How can I inform  "Permanently" this computer about me being the unique and sole administrator?

Thanks.

 

Administrator.docx

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