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  1. These details may be useful, I’ll try to specify every little detail about the issue that I can remember: Summary of my laptop’s specs: ASUS TUF FX505GE, i7–8750, GTX 1050Ti 4GB, 8GB RAM, SSD+HDD, Windows 10 Home Edition SL The laptop is still relatively new, just bought around 1 month ago but the issue started since around last week. At first, there was no issue at all. The lagging issue occurred whenever I unplugged my laptop from the charger, 1–2 seconds after Windows automatically switch the power plan to Power Saver mode. Suddenly, the cursor apparently disappears. When I tried to move the the mouse/trackpad to get the cursor to the bottom of the screen to show the taskbar (I hide the taskbar), I notice from the taskbar opening animation that the OS is lagging very, very bad. I also confirmed that it is lagging when I hit the Windows button and saw that the start menu opens up very slow and jagged. Related to the above, I’ve tried to fiddle with the Power Saver plan and the overall power management settings in Windows to no avail. Also have tried to reset the power plan settings to default. Still related to the above, I tried to stop Windows from switching automatically to Power Saver plan when unplugging the charger but I can’t find any helpful article in the internet. Plugging the laptop in to the power socket after the lagging appears does not solve the issue. When it is lagging, the only thing I could do is to fire up Ctrl+Alt+Del and restart, with the charger plugged in since booting up. During the Ctrl+Alt+Del screen (I don’t know the proper name for it, it’s the menu that is displayed after you hit the three keys that shows the option of Task Manager, restart, shut down, etc), I noticed that the cursor is there and I can move it smoothly without any lagging issues If I log out, the lagging issue is gone in the login screen. However, after signing in to my account again, the lagging issue comes back even after I plugged the laptop in. I have all the latest updates from the Windows Update, and also made sure that all the drivers are up-to-date. While researching for this issue, I found that the laptop battery status says “plugged in, not charging”. I managed to solve this issue after searching through the web but the main lagging issue still persists. Because I very rarely travel with my laptop, most of the time I left the laptop at my desk. However, I always plugged it in to the power socket even when the battery is already full (looks like this is the cause of the “plugged in, not charging” issue above). I have also uninstalled the Windows-related softwares that came with the laptop from ASUS, but still have the issue. I haven’t ruled out the possibility of any hardware-related cause because I haven’t tried the reset Windows option, but somehow all things are pointing out to software/OS-related issue. This issue seems to be very specific and I couldn’t find any topic about this issue in the internet. It’s very annoying when I have to use my laptop while traveling. Any help or insight is very much appreciated. Thank you.
  2. Early features and functionality are starting to appear in the latest Windows 10 Redstone 3 builds; the next major revision of Microsoft's client operating system. Microsoft is currently working on the core of the operating system to support new features that will define this release. Two new features focus on performance, mobility and IT-Pro's. Build 16179 includes the usual assortment of bug fixes users have diligently reported using the Feedback app. Windows 10 Mobile also received a new build, 15205, which is still on the Redstone 2 branch. Its a long road ahead, but we should get a clearer picture about Windows 10 RS3 at Microsoft's developer conference, next month.
  3. Back in July, users in the Surface forums, on the Microsoft Community, started reporting issues regarding battery life rapidly depleting on some Surface Pro 3 devices. A forum participant, Kridsada Thanabulpong, described a fully charged battery degrading by 80% just within a few weeks of charge. Of course, this got me quite concerned, since I am a proud owner of a Surface Pro 3 device myself. It is quite normal for battery life to eventually loose charge over time, especially taking into account normal usage and recharge cycles. In the case of this particular Surface Pro 3, battery life should not degrade only after one year of use. Battery Life on Certain Surface Pro 3 Devices Rapidly Depleting Quite a number of users are reported similar behaviour with their Surface Pro 3 devices. SIMPLO, the manufacturer of the battery cell used in the in the affected Surface Pro 3, seems to be at fault. Thankfully, not all Surface Pro 3 devices use the same brand battery cells. You can check your battery manufacturer by running the powercfg /batteryreport command. Press Windows key + X, click Command Prompt (Admin), type powercfg /batteryreport at the command prompt then hit the Enter key. The report will be saved under C:\Windows\System32 as battery-report. Lucky for me, the battery in my Surface Pro 3 is manufactured by LION. So that’s one less thing to worry about. Unfortunately, for Surface Pro 3 owners with affected batteries, whose device might be out of warranty; it will cost more than $500 to fix. Today, Microsoft released a Firmware Update with a fix for the Battery problems. Affected users can grab the firmware update from Windows Update. The Surface Pro 3 is a great device, but it’s not without its troubles. Earlier this year, Microsoft announced a power cord power cord recall program for Surface Pro 3. This was due to the neck of the adapter being prone to wear and tear. I experienced a bit of difficulty qualifying for the program since Jamaica is not a supported region. A friend in the US was able to help me out and had it shipped to Jamaica.